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in washington. the writing has appeared in "the new york times," "politico," foreign policy and washington monthly among others. they came to us last night from virginia, took a late night train and what i'd like to do is turn it over to you for your thoughts and comments to start off. >> thank you very much. i'm going to start for us today. let me thank you much for hosting us to thank you for coming. it's an honor pleasure and we look forward to nature scene discussion today. i'm going to start with two provocative themes from our new book, "going to tehran: why the united states must come to terms with the islamic republic of iran". the first of these means, and these two get at the heart of our book. the united states is today enhanced and for the past two years a power and relative decline in the middle east. the second core team as the biggest beneficiary of american ongoing decline in the middle east is the islamic republic of iran. if you're not sure you agree with these propositions, i want to ask you to compare the relative position of the united states and the islamic republic o
of the first administration's foreign policy and hillary clinton's tenure at state and i think the defining external event to the administration of foreign policy has been the arab spring, obviously, and all that uncorked and how to manage that. but before we get to that, we still have robin on satellite. i want to talk about the relationship between the president and hillary clinton and the degree to which the legacy of foreign policy in the first term has been hillary clinton's legacy and the degree to which it really has been -- the shots have been called from the white house because a lot of reporting on this has been very interesting. tonight there's going to be an interview on "60 minutes" that's a joint interview between the president and hillary clinton, a joint exit interview, and this is what the president had to say about hillary clinton's legacy. >> hillary will go down as one of the finest secretary of states we've had. it has been a great collaboration over the last four years. i'm going to miss her. i wish she was sticking around. but she has logged in so many miles i can't b
in the foreign policy in the president's speech. how did you characterize this president's approach to foreign policy? >> i think he doesn't want to deal with it, frankly. a lot of people in this country would agree with him. i think this administration would much rather focus on guns and taxes and other social issues and not deal with the quagmire that is the middle east. the bush years were deep in iraq and afghanistan trying to get between the sunni and shia fight and i think this administration would rather not deal with it. sounds great, but i don't think that's an option because the foreign policy and the rest of the world comes knocking on your door and the way things are heading right now while we would like to ignore it or not i don't think we'll be able to. >> nbc's chief foreign correspondent richard engel, always good to see you. the invitation is open. i know you're not stateside much, but when you are, come back. >> i look forward to. >> now to what could shape up to be the senate race in 2014, the battle in kentucky. senate minority leader mitch mcconnell will be making a bid fo
of state and what he means to obama foreign policy. we will be talking to a man who put the fate of the keystone pipeline and the fate of the president's hands. we have dave heineman with his approval to give president obama a second chance. we begin with the obama party is campaign to ban assault weapons. they not only want to ban assault weapons but certain handouts. for more on what the democrats are trying to do to our second amendment rights, we bring in shannon bream. reporter: senator dianne feinstein acknowledges that it will be an uphill battle. this new measure would ban the sale and manufacture and transfer and importation of 157 specific garments, along with a broader group of other guns that will meet at a lower threshold for being classified as an assault weapon is the sale and transfer and gifting of anything classified as an assault weapon. >> no weapon is taken from anyone. the purpose is to try up the supply of these weapons over time. therefore there is no sunset on the spell of. reporter: the children in the newtown, connecticut, massacre would likely still be
's foreign policy vision well morning at the same time that u.s. influence depends on the ability to tackle our debt. >> more than ever for an policy is economic policy. i am especially cognizant of the fact that we cannot be strong in the world. lou: joining us now, fox news national security analysts, holding national security posts under three different presidents . former state department director of policy planning under president george w. bush and president of washington college. good to have you with this. let me start with you, if i may. i was -- actually, i was heartened to hear senator kerrey acknowledged the importance of us strong economy to our foreign policy. >> racking up all of this debt. as a result i think our ability to influence events is greatly decreased. hillary clinton, the of going secretary says, don't pick a fight with your banker. so i think secretary carey, when he comes into office will have a much harder time because of the whole economic sovereignty issue lou: your reaction? >> at the that is absolutely right. the real challenges have to continue to promote
. afghanistan, there's no guarantee of the future. these are -- the foreign policy record, especially as it relates to terrorism, is not much of a record. >> and caryn, you've been covering the foreign policy as well as the domestic policy. this "60 minutes" interview, the joint interview, was pretty extraordinary on the face of it, but as we enter this last week of hillary clinton's tenure, the president is basically saying, you know, thank you, thank you, thank you for everything you've done. >> yeah. and she has been i think in many ways -- there are not a lot of sort of big monumental tangible accomplishments of her tenure as secretary of state. in many ways she was successful as much because of what she represented, but the history of second terms is that foreign policy becomes much more important, that presidents travel more, that they often engage more with the rest of the world, and i think that given the set of events we're looking at overseas, that is very likely to be the case of president obama's second term. foreign policy almost wasn't even almost mentioned in this elect
on here, willie? >> they didn't break any new foreign policy ground, that was clear, in terms of the questioning. so then you're left to wonder what was going on there? what was the idea? although it was remarkable to see the two of them sitting together if you thought about where we were five years ago and them saying shame on you and you're likeable enough. >> you're a racist. >> andrea mitchell, am i being too cynical this morning? because these are two people i respect a great deal. >> a great deal. >> well, it was sort of -- as you're pointing out, it was really unusual to see them together. and to see the relationship that they have developed, i think that they have developed a close relationship. i was really intrigued by when he -- when steve kroft asked about what about the staffs, and they acknowledged it took longer for their staffs to get over the hurt and anger after the campaign, and i would say still hasn't happened, exactly. because she has been the most celebrated secretary of state and certainly the most high-profile member of the cabinet. and gets along very
of the president's meek foreign policy. it was score one for hillary and i think this was an attempt to kind of build on that and move beyond it and talk about hillary clinton's legacy as a whole rather than that event. >> chris: i want to pick up on that, brit. during the hearing what struck me was the republicans were tough on hillary on benghazi. the democrats weren't. both sides kept saying what a great secretary of state she had been and to praise her service. some of the accomplishment. helped assemble the bombing campaign in libya to topple khadafi. assembled the coalition with the toughest sanctions ever on iran and established diplomatic ties with burma. >> i think the examples would add up to a case for her competence. they do not add up to a case for greatness. the groundwork on burma had been ton by the previous administration and the administration properly followed through on it. are arabs and israelis closer to peace? how about iran and north korea and the nuclear programs? halted or seriously set back? has the reset with russia which she so famously introduced with the photo
tonight. the fight against al qaeda and militant islam in africa. one of the many foreign policy challenges for the commander and chief's second term. the state department today confirmed that last week's hostage standoff at a gas plant in algeria did kill three americans: according to the prime minister. two canadians and team of explosive experts who had planned to blow up the place. the prime minister also said the military operation to free those hostage resulted in the deaths of dozens of prisoners. you will recall last week the militants stormed the facility near the lib i can't be border. according to the al gearian they claim it was pay back for algeria letting french jets use airspace to attack infamous fighters in neighboring mali. jonathan hunt has this in new york tonight. jonathan, last week we had a lot of criticism of the algerians. there seems to be a change in tone now. >> yeah, very much so. last week the british and japanese governments in particular were very critical of what they saw as an overly aggressive and heavy handed response by the algerian security
's foreign policy aide related for diplomacy and our presence throughout the world. if you let back -- look back to congress 20, 25 years ago, is essentially made up of people who have the relationship to world war ii and its aftermath in terms of the u.s. global engagement. the marshall plan and the rebuilding of japan in america's prisons. in the relationship also in the lessons and threat posed by the cold war. and those were very defining, major umbrella issues that produced great statesman. henry jackson and others on a bipartisan bill and water's edge, america's presence and engagement around the world. two superpowers, the umbrella that was held over the world stifled the regional and local factions and tensions that erupted after the end of the cold war. that all had a significant impact on the american people and commitment and support for the u.s. to be at bobo -- be globally engaged. it is the possibility of a five alarm fire and everybody's been to try to keep them from getting out of control. with the fall of the wall in the aftermath, there was the defining event and that was
't manage to put benghazi into the broader context of the president's weak foreign policy which i'll be important to them when they deal, for instance with the hagel nomination. so it was score one for hillary and i think it was an attempt to build on that and move beyond it and talk about her legacy as a whole rather than that event. >> chris: i want to pick up on that, brit. because, during the hearing, what struck me was the republicans were tough on hillary, on benghazi and the democrats weren't. but, both sides kept on saying what a great secretary of state she had been and to praise her service. and here's some of the points that have been brought up, some of her accomplishments. she helped assemble the bombing campaign in libya, to topple muammar qaddafi. she helped assembly the coalition that imposed the toughest sanctions ever on iran. and, she established diplomatic ties with burma. question, brit: how do you rate hillary clinton's performance, record as our top diplomat. >> i think those examples you cited would add up to a case for her competence. they do not add up to
and their second terms end up focusing on foreign policy, maybe more than they intend to, maybe more than their first terms. why is that? >> the main reason probably is when a president comes in for a second term, he usually has about six to eight months to get things through congress. it may seem small, but even lbj in '65, with 61% presidential landslide, more democrats 234 congress than any other time in the 20th scentry except for roosevelt, he knew enough about the senate and the house, he said i've got six months because i'm going to be asking democrats and some republicans to cast some risky votes. after a while, they're going to start rebelling because they're going to look to the election ne next year. foreign policy is something you can do without running to congress for permission ever day. >> ah. it's the can when you can't do other things. >> indeed. >> they're always from history. in terms of the president looking ahead at six to eight months, what they're telegraphing right now from the white house is that the heavy lift they're going to ask for is a variety of measures rel
or foreign policy, the challenge is to overcome those obstacles that the political culture place in front of them. host: a call from cincinnati, ohio. caller: in a country where originally white people were not even citizens of this country and now we have a black president, i think we've come a long way. i feel that president obama has not done enough for either side. i think in the beginning it was an issue for him. now he's just like, i am going to be the president. but there are still people who cannot get past that. how does that affect his second term? i have to say, particularly republicans -- how do we get people over the issue of his race? guest: the sad reality is, there are some people that -- i do not think we want to make the mistake of exaggerating their numbers -- there are some people for whom they will never get over the issue of race. there are other people who quite sincerely, for reasons having nothing to do with race, believe that the president's agenda, in their estimation, is too fill-in-the-blank. the larger issue is how we create a political process in which any p
foreign policy issues that we're facing out there that didn't get touched. >> you're right, and one vicky mentions legacy and i think it was joe poll lack of breitbart news was the first to notice the words peace in our time a and. >> yes, absolutely. >> and chamberlain and coming back from the munich deal with hitler, and most misbegotten and it slipped by the fact checkers and-- >> nobody noticed and-- >> i did. >> jon: and now newsweek magazine, which is an online only publication, i guess you would call it. the second coming. now, conservatives have long complained that president obama thinks that of himself, but now, cal, they have he' made it official, i guess. >> he was treated the first time around and i think the media put too much faith in politics and government because it reflects their particular ideological bias and they really -- they're setting him up for a no-fail second term. they're not going to hold him accountable and didn't hold him accountable in the first term and afraid of being branded racist and they agree with him. one mentioned al roker embarrassed himself. he
security hawk. very knowledgeable about foreign policy. he is a, wish there were a better term for this, he's a social conservative. that term will have to do. and he's a hell of a guy. ladies and gentlemen, the new senator from texas, r, and capital r, rafael ted cruz. \[applause] >> thank you so much. jay has been a dear friend a long, long time. i told jay please -- you know this past week was a momentous week -- oh, i need a mike? hello, hello. >> as they said in the 20 70 campaign, help is on the way. \[laughter] so when the mike wasn't working i told all sorts of embarrassing secrets about jay nordlinger and i trust all of you got them in full lurid detail. this past week has been a momentous week. president obama was sworn in to a second term. i guess what made the news is beyonce apparently lip synced throughout the inaugural. not as widely reported was the fact that president obama did as well. who knew that his teleprompter could play music? we saw this week an ode to liberalism, unabashed, unapologetic, i have to say sitting there it occurred to me somewhere the sea must be risin
the speech, however, briep, was the absence of foreign policy. and the two really contentious appointments, or at least one is chuck hagel who is going to run the defense department. and the middle east is aflame again and now we're seeing it spread into africa in a way that is very hard to get a fix for what the model is dealing with it. these are failed states. we have tribalism again prevailing in africa and again in the middle east because islamic rage has not been distinguished. command and control of al qaeda they believe has been broken down, but as you saw in algeria in the past several days, this is going to be a continuing problem out there. that will go to the defense department, how it's run, how much money they have to spend, how they reorganized the response of that and secretary kerry would is going to pick up the baton from hillary clinton has to decide what's our relationship with egypt? how run by a muslim brotherhood. >> it's worth remarking on that because four years ago, as we all sat here, none of us expected every assumption you would make about the middle east for d
-- and so you've had a lot to say about foreign policy. you've also had a thing or two to say about the republican position on taxes and a number of other issues. so i wonder, is your view that republicans need to get right on foreign policy and can that that is really a core issue that's affecting everything else, or do you see that fundamentally as a garnish on the salad, something maybe we ought to -- a nice to have, not an essential? >> you know, i think we need as a party to have -- i won't try to say his last name because i always butcher it myself -- i think we need john and bill need that wing of the party, but we also need realists that acted and thought and saw the world like we with did when we were in congress in the 1990s, when we controlled congress from '94 on where we believe inside a restrained foreign policy. .. as long as republicans have a coherent foreign policy, i think americans will go along with it. i think our bigger problem from the bush era came from the fact he's a big government republican. he came in with $155 billion surplus. when you left we had a tr
on jobs and on foreign policy, making america stronger in trade and national security. >> the way you talk it makes it sound as if we don't have a really divided congress. talking to people on both sides pretty much every day of my work day. >> nothing worthwhile is easy and every inch of ground the president has to gain. but a lot of wind at his back right now and i won't say he will do lay-ups, but this president delivered through his first term. he has been able to do a lot in the first term. the second term will be a good one. >> do you think we'll hear in the inauguration address that talks about that? will you hear -- they told us, unity and hopeful. that's about it. but do you think you will hear -- he will talk about reaching out an olive branch to republicans? >> this is a republican i have heard talk about the importance of america americans to step up. democracy is not a spectator sport. he needs all of us to be involved. all of us need to step up and play a role in the destiny of our country. in the end of the day, this is one of the greatest speakers we have seen in my generat
,000 front line jobs to women in the military. "outfront" tonight, rosa brooks, a columnist for foreign policy and has worked in the pentagon under the obama administration and david frum, former speech writer for george w. bush and critter for us. right now, 40% of active duty are women. this could be hundreds of thousand of jobs suddenly would be open to women. am i right in saying this is hublgly significant? >> it's absolutely enormous. the one thing i would say though, the it's not that we don't have women in combat positions. we have women who are ineligible under the former policy, but there really isn't any front line in today's wars. fighting heroically in combat, women who have died in combat. this change just recognizes what's already a reality, frankly. >> david, please be blunt. i know what you have to say is, might offend some people, but this is important. why do you think women in combat is not a good idea? >> i think we need to stress, this is quite an abstract notion. the number of women who will speak and equally is likely to be quite low, but of those who do, i think
're also entering into a new age of some beg decision in foreign policy because this country right now is starting to get some adversaries around the world because of our drone policy. that was not the situation four years ago. so this is -- our foreign policy is going to be judged on just how aggressive we get with that, and there's a growing concern in the community across the country about the drone attacks. just how many innocent people are we killing? there's been concerted conversation about we have to reel this in, and president obama, i think, is going to hear a great deal about that when it comes to foreign policy coming up here in the coming months. just how aggressive are we going to get? >> that specific reference that we should not be in a state of perpetual war. >> we are, and it's a different kind of war. >> i mean, that's the -- legally that's the justification that they cite for saying why it is that we can kill people in places where we're technically not waging some sort of war. that there is a global war still underway, and the authorization of using military force
is that republicans need to get right on foreign policy and that is a core issue that is affecting everything else? are you seeing it as a garnish on the salad? not essential. >> as a party, we need to have john and bill on that wing of the party. we also need those who acted and soggy world like we did -- and saw the world like we did in congress or we believed in a restrained foreign policy. that is part of the balance. did you go back and look at what william buckley said about iraq. he said it was not a conservative of venture. there's nothing conservative about believing that you're going to be able to change the way people live and think in other countries that do not have a democratic background. i think the bigger problem really has to duet the domestic side of things. as long as republicans have a coherent foreign policy, i think americans will go along with its. the bigger problem from the bush era came that he was a big government republican. we had $155 billion surplus when he came in. when you that we had a $1 trillion deficit. our national debt doubled. we had a seven million-dollar
justice. dr. king was a fierce critic of foreign policy in the vietnam war. in his beyond vietnam speech, which he delivered at the york's riverside church, 1967, a year before the day he was assassinated, dr. king calledll the united states the greatest purveyor of violence in the world today. "time" magazine called the speech demagogic slander that sounded like a script for radio hanoi. today, we let you decide. we play an excerpt of dr. king's speech, beyond vietnam. >> after 1954, they watched us conspire to prevent elections which could have surely brought ho chi minh to power over the united vietnam and they realized they had been did -- betrayed again. when we asked why they do not leap to negotiate, these things must be remembered. also it must be clear that the leaders of hanoi considered the presence of american troops in support of the diem regime to have been the initial military breach of the geneva agreements concerning foreign troops. and they remind us that they did not begin to send troops in large numbers and even supplies, and to the south, until american forces had mo
as a devout man involved in every major foreign policy decision of this administration. >>> following breaking news. an appeals court ruling of his appointments unconstitutional. i'll speak with pete williams about what it means for the president and the white house. >>> plus, georgia republican senator chambliss announced his re retirement and republicans say it's one of the best pickup opportunities for the cycle. and you can always join our conversation on twitter. we've all had those moments. when you lost the thing you can't believe you lost. when what you just bought, just broke. or when you have a little trouble a long way from home... as an american express cardmember you can expect some help. but what you might not expect, is you can get all this with a prepaid card. spends like cash. feels like membership. [ female announcer ] some people like to pretend a flood could never happen to them. and that their homeowners insurance protects them. [ thunder crashes ] it doesn't. stop pretending. only flood insurance covers floods. ♪ visit floodsmart.gov/pretend to learn your risk. she was
we believed in a restrained foreign policy. so that's part of the balance. you know, you go back and you look at what william buckley said about iraq and he said it wasn't a conservative venture because there's nothing conservative about believing you're going to be able to change the way people live and think in other countries that don't have a democratic background. those were buckley's words, not mine. i think the bigger problem, though, really has to do on the domestic side of things because, you know, republicans i think as long as republicans have a coherent foreign policy, i think americans will go along with it. i think our bigger problem from the bush era came from he was a big government republican. he came in, we had $155 billion surplus. when he left we had $1 trillion deficit. our national debt doubled. we had a $7 trillion medicare drug benefit plan that polls showed was a 50/50 proposition at best. george w. bush didn't veto a single appropriations bill. and we saw not only -- because when you say this and start going down the list, some republicans get defensive.
republican friends to be fair. i used to put republicans because i would trust them or on foreign policy. i think anybody who is fair and would look at the president's record -- he has done a wonderful job of advancing our interests as well as protecting us. once again, thank you 4 c- span.org so much. i am enjoying the coverage. host: naomi tweets in -- the metro stations here are very crowded. as we mentioned, metro is planning a rush hour schedule, which means a train every five- six minutes at every station throughout the day because of the large crowds. about 800,000 is the current estimate, to attend the inauguration wendy is on american calling in from sydney, australia. good afternoon, good evening, good morning to you. caller: it is good evening here. host: are you watching online? caller: i am watching on tv, on cable. i spent a good portion of my adult life here, but i am constantly reading -- reading the news about the state. i still consider myself a think sometimes my perspective gives me a broader vision. i can see the discord, the downside of what has been happening, but i c
. a lot of foreign policy experience and not a lot of domestic policy experience. how do you read the announcement? >> he has jack lew. he has joe biden to send up for the all-important relationships on capitol hill. i think this was a legacy pick. the president now has as we know an ambitious agenda that he laid out in the inaugural address. the question is, who is going to protect those goals from him? it's someone he has been with ever since his federal public life has started. that's mcdonough. this is somebody he trusts to protect not just himself. not just the staff, but to move that legacy and the obama era sooner or later will come to an end. the president clearly wants to make the major shape now. i think that's why he picked this man he trusts and has known for so long. >> john kerry ends before the senate foreign relations committee and he will be confirmed. i don't think there is any doubt about that. chuck hagel, that could be a little bit more. >> i think they will rough him up and be more lively than the john kerry hearings. in the end, the numbers. once senator sch
with president george w. bush and foreign policy will be happening in the second term. >> the first thing that strikes me on a day like today is what a wonderful celebration this is with our democracy. the peaceful transfer of power. of course president obama is being affirmed again, but we look at our institutions. you see the supreme court justice swear in the president. it's a wonderful thing and it's something that when you've traveled around the world, not every country can take this moment for granted. when the will of the people is confirmed and affirmed the way we're going to see today. >> the president is speaking to the world, he's speaking to the united states, he's speaking to the people in washington and he's speaking to republicans. what does he need to say to republicans? >> on inaugural day, it is really the high point for any presidency, i think, because after that we start to get back to our regular criticism, and we did this wrong and that wrong, and so i would hope the president would use the opportunity to say i've won the election, but this
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 69 (some duplicates have been removed)